monstrous

monstrous 1 Monstrous, prodigious, tremendous, stupendous, monumental are comparable especially in their extended more or less hyperbolical senses in which they mean astonishingly impressive.
Monstrous commonly applies to something abnormal, usually in actual or relative size, but often also in shape or character; the term frequently carries suggestions of deformity, extreme ugliness, or fabulousness
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the imagination turbid with monstrous fancies and misshapen dreams— Wilde

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he seemed of monstrous bulk and significance—G. D. Brown

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the monstrous way of living that mankind had made for itself out of the industrial revolution— Connolly

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Prodigious usually implies a marvelousness that exceeds belief; it sometimes applies to something entirely out of proportion to what is the previous or usual best, greatest, or largest
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the prodigious demand for steel in the First World War

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men have always reverenced prodigious inborn gifts, and always will— Eliot

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a mind with such prodigious capacity of development as Shakespeare's— T. S. Eliot

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Tremendous may come closer to awe-inspiring or terrifying in its immensity than to gigantic or enormous, its common denotations in more literal use
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must have made the animal in life look very much like a crocodile and the bite must have been tremendousSwinton

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how shall we compare the cramped and limited vision of the universe which spread itself to the imagination of mankind in old time with the tremendous vistas opened out to us by modern science— Inge

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the spell and tremendous incantation of the thought of death— L. P. Smith

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[he] too, had his appointed or acquired limits. He could never be tremendousMontague

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Stupendous implies the power to stun or astound; it describes something that because of its size, its numbers, its complexity, or its greatness exceeds one's power to describe or explain
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all are but parts of one stupendous whole, whose body Nature is, and God the soul— Pope

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a stupendous catastrophe that occurred in the constellation Hercules 1300 years ago— Kaempffert

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Monumental in its extended sense (see also MASSIVE) applies to something as conspicuously impressive or as massively framed or constructed as such a monument as a great cathedral or an impressive memorial
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his magnum opus . . . the five monumental volumes of his history of the writer in America— Trilling

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the Mexican peon has a monumental reserve beside which the Englishman becomes an idle chatterer— Woodcock

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Analogous words: enormous, immense, *huge, vast, colossal, mammoth, gigantic
2 *outrageous, heinous, atrocious
Analogous words: *flagrant, glaring, gross, rank: *ominous, portentous, fateful: flagitious, nefarious, infamous (see VICIOUS)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • Monstrous — may refer to: Monstrous carbuncle, a term used to describe modernist architecture which is unsympathetic to its surroundings Monstrous humanoid, a creature type in the Dungeons Dragons fantasy role playing game Monstrous moonshine, a mathematical …   Wikipedia

  • Monstrous — Mon strous, a. [OE. monstruous, F. monstrueux, fr. L. monstruosus, fr. monstrum. See {Monster}.] 1. Marvelous; strange. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Having the qualities of a monster; deviating greatly from the natural form or character; abnormal; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Monstrous — Mon strous, adv. Exceedingly; very; very much. A monstrous thick oil on the top. Bacon. [1913 Webster] And will be monstrous witty on the poor. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • monstrous — (adj.) mid 15c., unnatural, deviating from the natural order, hideous, from M.Fr. monstrueux, from L. monstruosus strange, unnatural, monstrous, from monstrum (see MONSTER (Cf. monster)). Meaning enormous is from c.1500; that of outrageously… …   Etymology dictionary

  • monstrous — [adj1] unnatural, shocking aberrant, abnormal, atrocious, cruel, desperate, devilish, diabolical, disgraceful, dreadful, egregious, evil, fiendish, flagitious, foul, freakish, frightful, grotesque, gruesome, heinous, hellish, hideous, horrendous …   New thesaurus

  • monstrous — index arrant (onerous), bad (offensive), delinquent (guilty of a misdeed), diabolic, flagrant, gross ( …   Law dictionary

  • monstrous — ► ADJECTIVE 1) very large and ugly or frightening. 2) outrageously evil or wrong. DERIVATIVES monstrously adverb monstrousness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • monstrous — [män′strəs] adj. [LME < OFr monstreux < L monstrosus < monstrum: see MONSTER] 1. abnormally or prodigiously large; huge; enormous 2. very unnatural or abnormal in shape, type, or character 3. having the character or appearance of a… …   English World dictionary

  • monstrous — adj. 1) monstrous to + inf. (it is monstrous to preach hatred) 2) monstrous that + clause (it s monstrous that innocent children throughout the world go hungry) * * * [ mɒnstrəs] monstrous to + inf. (it is monstrous to preach hatred) monstrous… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • monstrous — [[t]mɒ̱nstrəs[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n If you describe a situation or event as monstrous, you mean that it is extremely shocking or unfair. She endured the monstrous behaviour for years... I just hope the people who committed this monstrous… …   English dictionary

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